U.S. launches first airstrikes against ISIS inside Syria

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(CNN) — The United States and several Arab nations rained bombs on ISIS targets in Syria on Tuesday — the first U.S. military offensive in the war-torn country and a forceful message to the militant group that America would not stand by idly while it carried out its rampage of terror

The airstrikes focused on the city of Raqqa, the declared capital of ISIS’ self-proclaimed Islamic State. But other areas were hit as well.

The operation began with a flurry of Tomahawk missiles launched from the sea, followed by attacks from bomber and fighter aircraft, a senior U.S. military official told CNN.

The goal: Taking out ISIS’ ability to command, control, resupply and retrain it fighters.

The number of casualties was not immediately clear. But opposition activists said least 20 targets in an around Raqqa were hit, including a post office, a recruitment center and a building in the governor’s compound.

CNN National Security Analyst Fran Townsend said attacks are just the beginning.

Eventually, she said, there will likely be “a real campaign to go after leadership targets.”

Celebration amid fear

For months, civilians in Raqqa have been living under the harsh rule of ISIS after militants took over their city, once one of the nation’s most liberal cities. The group now controls much of their lives, imposing a strict brand of Sharia law and meting out barbaric punishments, such as beheadings and crucifixions.

Abo Ismail, an opposition activist inside Raqqa, said Wednesday morning that residents were elated to see the U.S. attacking ISIS targets there.

But at the same time, he said, ISIS has increased security in the city.

“I would dance in the streets, but I am too afraid,” Ismail said.

A U.S. intelligence official said that while law enforcement is aware the airstrikes against ISIS in Syria could incite a response, there is no evidence to suggest any terrorist strike is in the works against the United States.

Arab countries on board

Perhaps the most surprising part of the strikes against ISIS was who joined the United States.

Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and Qatar all assisted with the operation, sources told CNN.

“It’s a remarkable diplomatic achievement,” said CNN political commentator Peter Beinhart. “I don’t think it was expected that there would be this much Arab support.”

Former CIA counterterrorism official Philip Mudd said the inclusion of Sunni-majority countries fighting a radical Sunni militant group sends a strong message.

“Prominent religious leaders have said ISIS is not representative of Islam, and now you have countries that are coming to the fore to attack it,” he said.

A ‘punch in the nose’

Until now, ISIS has been able to take over cities and operate in Syria with near impunity. Now, it’s coming under attack.

“This is the punch in the nose to the bully that we talked about on the playground,” former Delta Force officer James Reese said. “ISIS is the bully, and we just punched him in the nose.”

With the airstrikes, the United States enters a new level of engagement in the ongoing 3-year-old Syrian civil war.

Obama had resisted U.S. military action in Syria, but as ISIS made sweeping advances in both Middle Eastern neighbors, calls for such a step grew.

“I have made it clear that we will hunt down terrorists who threaten our country, wherever they are,” Obama said in a September 10 speech.

“That means I will not hesitate to take action against ISIL in Syria, as well as Iraq. This is a core principle of my presidency: if you threaten America, you will find no safe haven.”

Not over yet

Mudd said Tuesday’s attacks were “just the start.”

“This is not a definitive blow,” said Mudd, who previously worked for the CIA.

“When this gets interesting to me … is six months down the road, when a second-tier ISIS commander starts to create some sort of cell to recruit foreigners from Europe or the United States or Canada into Syria. Do we still have the will and capability, and the intelligence, to locate that person, or that group of people, and put lead on the target?”

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