Protesters fill streets across country as Ferguson protests spread coast to coast

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(CNN) — The sparks of outrage that started in Ferguson, Missouri, have ignited a firestorm of protests across the country.

But the national furor isn’t just about one grand jury’s decision on one shooting case. To many protesters, the death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown — and the lack of an indictment for the officer who shot him — are symbolic of racial injustice in America.

“I think that it’s important for people to know that the decision not to indict (Officer) Darren Wilson means that the system does not value black lives,” one protester marching through Los Angeles told CNN.

“I think that it means that a cop can kill a black or brown kid when he’s defenseless and unarmed and not get charged. I think that it means that we either fight back and stand up and end police terrorism.”

More than 170 protests sprouted up across the country Tuesday. Some demonstrations blocked bridges, tunnels and major highways. But unlike the violence that erupted in Ferguson on Monday night, most of the crowds were peaceful.

In New York, protesters spanning an array of races and ages filled Times Square with their hands up, some chanting, “Don’t shoot.” In Washington, demonstrators including preparatory school students lay silently on a sidewalk, as if dead.

Here’s what the country looked like Tuesday:

Atlanta

The Public Enemy anthem pumping from mounted speakers at a protest in downtown Atlanta captured the mood of the crowd of roughly 300 Tuesday night.

“Fight the Power,” the rapper’s voice shouted over the speaker. “Fight the powers that be. …”

Some Atlanta protesters held signs that read “Enough” and “We are all one bullet away from being a hashtag.”

“It’s a travesty; it’s just not right,” ShaCzar Brown said as held up a sign that said, “Stop killer cops.”

“Seventy years ago, it was legal to kill black people,” Brown says, referring to the spate of lynchings that spread through the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. “It’s essentially still legal.”

Boston

Mayor Marty Walsh estimated about 1,000 protesters took to the streets Tuesday night.

The gathering has been largely peaceful.

“It’s a beautiful thing to see,” demonstrator Daniel Jose Older said.

Chicago

About 200 members of the Black Youth Project 100 started a 28-hour sit-in outside Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office Tuesday afternoon.

Why 28 hours? According to the group, a black person is killed by a police officer or a person protected by the state every 28 hours in America.

Denver

Several hundred people took to the streets of Denver on Tuesday night, police said.

Officers tried to prevent demonstrators from marching onto Interstate 25. Most protesters dispersed peacefully, but a “small group” refused and grabbed officers.

Officers used pepper spray, and three people were arrested, police said.

Los Angeles

A stretch of the 101 Freeway in Los Angeles was temporarily shut down in both directions after protesters took road blocks from the streets and put them on the freeway, police said.

But protesters who gathered outside Los Angeles police headquarters demonstrated peacefully, Officer Sara Faden said.

An LAPD spokesman said officers were allowing people to vent.

“We have detained people. We don’t have any property damage to speak of,” Officer Jack Richter said. “We are letting (the people) exercise their constitutional rights.”

Minneapolis

A woman in a group blocking an intersection was run over by a car.

The Star Tribune newspaper reported that the driver of the car honked at the protesters before knocking a few people onto the hood of the vehicle and apparently running over the woman’s legs. She was hospitalized with “very minor injuries.”

New York

A massive protest wound its way from Union Square to FDR Drive and to the United Nations, Times Square and Harlem.

“Now it’s not clear where we’re going,” said CNN’s Miguel Marquez, who was interviewing protesters as they continued marching after midnight.

One demonstrator said he didn’t even know about the protest until he saw it pass by his workplace on Times Square. He decided to join in.

“I just want to help bring about change … sometimes I am profiled based on my race,” said the protester, who is black.

“I think this is progress … now we’re going to make sure things are going to change.”

As they marched, some protesters chanted, “Mike Brown! Mike Brown!”

Police, who were nearby in large numbers, stayed back and let the marchers go.

Oakland, California

Perhaps the greatest concentration of turmoil Tuesday night was in Oakland, where vandals smashed the windows of a car dealership and looted several businesses, including a T-Mobile cell phone store.

Some also set bonfires in the city. One row of bonfires stretched across a road, blocking off access, footage from CNN affiliate KPIX showed.

At least one person was seen adding more items to the fires.

Washington

In Washington, protesters lay down on a sidewalk outside police headquarters as if dead, according to a tweet by Nikki Burdine of CNN affiliate WUSA.

Some had handwritten notes on their chests: “Black lives matter.”

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