House, Senate leaders reach deal on Calif. drought, Flint

WASHINGTON (AP) — House and Senate leaders have reached a bipartisan agreement on a bill to authorize $170 million for Flint, Michigan and other cities beleaguered by lead in drinking water, and to provide relief to drought-stricken California.

A vote could be held this week. But the measure was jeopardized by sharp opposition from California Sen. Barbara Boxer and other Democrats who said it would harm drinking water quality and severely weaken the Endangered Species Act.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said Monday the measure would bring more water to his state for farming and other uses. He hailed support from California’s other Democratic senator, Dianne Feinstein, saying the measure “could not have been finalized” without her backing.

Feinstein defended the bill as “the best we can do” under a Republican-controlled Congress.

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2 comments

  • Jay

    In Evart, Michigan, which is just 120 miles from Flint, Nestle is in the process of negotiating a permit with the state of Michigan to increase its current pumping operations for its private bottled water business to 210 million gallons of water per year. In exchange for the selling off groundwater normally used by residents for drinking and bathing, Nestle — which is valued at over $200 billion — will only have to pay $200.

  • Jay

    The company currently pumps a little over 100 million gallons of water each year, or 250 gallons of water per minute, from Evart. Under the new proposed agreement, Nestle would suddenly be pumping 400 gallons of water per minute out of Evart to sell for profit. All it would need to pay is $200 for the permit.
    “Why on earth would the state of Michigan, given our lack of money to address water matters of our own, like Flint, even consider giving MORE water for little or no cost to a foreign corporation with annual profits in the billions