Cleaning company helps family after FOX 17 story on home contamination

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.--A Grand Rapids family moving into their new home was greeted with a nasty surprise, compliments of the previous owner. It's a story we first brought you earlier in the week when the O'Neil family discovered their home was toxic and contaminated from methamphetamine production.

"Depressing, exhausting, " said Holly O'Neil about living in her new home. "I think sometimes I'm just speechless. I don't know how or why someone would do this."

Holly O'Neil and her family have lived in the home for just over a month. But it's what they didn't know when they bought the home that's haunting them now. It's contaminated with methamphetamine.

"Their health is at risk," said Kam Bradman, owner of BioClean, a company that cleans up contamination. "You can read any report on that and the suggestion would be to decontaminate the home or find a way or means to get a different home.

The O'Neils home has more than two times the contamination recommended by the Kent County Heakth Department.

"Sadly, I've seen worse," said Bradman. "But contamination is contamination. If the health department were involved there would be no opportunity for you to stay here."

Possible health issues include problems with the respiratory and nervous system as well as other disabilities. Getting a new home, nor the $25,000 cleaning bill for their current home are feasible for the O'Neils. The cleanup is pricey because the contamination goes deep into the walls, ductwork and furniture.

"We've definitely called a lot of cleaning companies and the health department and the police. I think I've made so many phone calls it's hard for me to keep track of. I know Brian is working to bring things up to a state representative, no that won't help us, but at least it would help other people so they don't have this happen."

Michigan laws do not require an owner to disclose this type of contamination during a home sale.

If you'd like to help the O'Neils you can find their GoFundMe Page here.

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