Michigan works to conserve and restore Lake Sturgeon population

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All throughout West Michigan and the entire state, wildlife conservation efforts are happening every day to protect wildlife and natural resources for current and future generations. These efforts have led to the restoration of numerous populations of species like the Lake Sturgeon, which are important to keeping the Grand River, Great Lakes, and other bodies of Michigan water clean.

Leigh Ann went the the Grand Rapids Public Museum to talk with Dr. Stephanie Ogren, an expert on the fish species, and check out the museum's informational Lake Sturgeon exhibit.

Lake Sturgeon are a threatened species in Michigan. While the species itself has been around since the age of dinosaurs, their population in Michigan's waters has done from thousands, dwindling to only hundreds of fish remaining.

Efforts currently being made to preserve and protect these fish through the use of Streamside Rearing Facilities. These facilities store sturgeon eggs and larvae, raised in those waters, and then are released once they are big enough to survive on their own.

To learn more about the Lake Sturgeon and other exhibits at the Grand Rapids Public Museum, visit grpm.org.

Or to learn more about other great wildlife conservation stories the Michigan Wildlife Council has highlighted, visit hearformioutdoors.org.

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