Michigan’s first Measles case of 2015 confirmed

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LANSING, Mich. — The Michigan Department of Community Health has confirmed the state’s first measles case of the year.

The case involves an adult in Oakland County, and may be associated with the recent Disneyland outbreak in California, according to a release.

Michigan is now one of seven states reporting the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“As we are seeing with the recent outbreak in California, measles is a highly communicable disease that can affect both children and adults,”  Dr. Matthew Davis, Chief Medical Executive with MDCH, said in a release.  “The best way to protect our families and communities against measles is to get vaccinated.”

MDCH reports that there were five measles cases in Michigan last year, and 644 in the United States.   The vast majority of those cases were people who had no history of vaccination against measles, officials said in a release.

“The measles vaccine is highly effective and very safe. Adults who do not have evidence of immunity against measles should get at least one dose of the vaccine,” the release says.

 

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2 comments

  • get real

    As you may already be aware, many previous measles outbreaks have occurred among mostly vaccinated populations, for which health officials have no explanation other than to, again, blame the unvaccinated (which makes no sense). Many measles-vaccinated individuals have also come down with what’s known as “atypical” measles infection later in life, the direct result of having gotten vaccinated.

    In a paper published back in 1979, atypical measles infection was described as a “hypersensitivity” response to a natural measles infection due to having previously been injected with an inactivated measles virus. A measles epidemic that occurred several years prior in Northern California exhibited all the signs of atypical measles caused by vaccination.

    “In typical measles a maculopapular rash occurs first at the hairline, progresses caudally, is concentrated on the face and trunk, and is often accompanied by Koplik’s spots,” explains the study, as reported by the International Medical Council on Vaccination.

    “In AMS [atypical measles] the rash Is morphologically a mixture of maculopapular, petechial, vesicular, and urticarial components. It usually begins and is concentrated primarily on the extremities, progresses cephalad, and is not accompanied by Koplik’s spots.”

    Without going into too many details, the point here is that a measles-vaccinated population was responsible for this particular outbreak, and likely many others. And yet the mainstream media is making no mention of AMS in its reports, instead choosing to perpetuate the lie that unvaccinated people are always the cause of disease outbreaks. While they may be the cause in some cases, they are most likely not in most of them.

    As we reported back in 2011, the Institute of Medicine even admitted in a report claiming that MMR vaccines don’t cause autism that the vaccines can, in fact, cause measles. On page 574, in fact, this report claims that the evidence “convincingly supports” the notion that MMR vaccines cause measles.