Almanacs make their cold and snowy predictions for winter

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As we move into the last month of summer, winter is already on many people’s mind.

Two famous long-time prognosticating publications are making their predictions for the 2016/2017 winter.  The Farmers’ Almanac is celebrating its 200th edition and the more senior, The Old Farmer’s Almanac, is marking its 225th year.  Both almanacs just published their yearly predictions.

from The Farmers' Almanac website

from The Farmers’ Almanac website

The Farmers’ Almanac, which is published in Maine, is predicting a harsh, cold winter with a lot of snow in November and December in the Great Lakes region, and a frigid February.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac, which is published in New Hampshire, is predicting a warmer-than-average winter in the “Lower Lakes” region which includes most of Michigan, part of Wisconsin, and northern Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, stretching into upstate New York.  But, precipitation will also be above normal in our area.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac also says that their prediction formulas are a secret and are locked in a black box in Dublin, New Hampshire.

Both almanacs use unconventional formulas like solar cycles, sun spots and climatology in their predictions.  Scientists (and FOX 17 meteorologists) generally frown upon the forecasts, so if you prefer a more scientific source, the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center has much of the Great Lakes in an average temperature outlook with above average precipitation for December, January and February.

From the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center

From the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center.

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